What we do

Eduction
EducationTalks & Events

We give talks at schools and provide bat walks and talks to educate the public and attend local shows to increase the public's awareness to the plight of bats. We also provide training on how to identify bats in the hand.
Read more

Eduction
EducationTalks & Events

We give talks at schools and provide bat walks and talks to educate the public and attend local shows to increase the public's awareness to the plight of bats. We also provide training on how to identify bats in the hand.
Read more

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ConservationResearch & Monitoring

We carry out research including roost and habitat surveys to build our knowledge of the ecology of the bats of West Yorkshire. We also receive and hold records on bat roosts and sightings from around the county

ConservationResearch & Monitoring

We carry out research including roost and habitat surveys to build our knowledge of the ecology of the bats of West Yorkshire. We also receive and hold records on bat roosts and sightings from around the county

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Bat being fed
Bat CareRescue, Rehab and Release

We work in partnership with Natural England to provide hands-on bat conservation. WYBG volunteers are on call to help injured and stranded bats across the county.

Bat being fed
Bat CareRescue, Rehab and Release

We work in partnership with Natural England to provide hands-on bat conservation. WYBG volunteers are on call to help injured and stranded bats across the county.

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Bat Group

Members

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Bat carers

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A year of Bat care

Some general stats about a typical year for a bat carer

Bats in care

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Releases

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Miles driven

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Injured by Cats

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Taken to Hospital

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Frequently Asked Questions

Here are a few of our frequently asked questions. We have a full page of FAQs here

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  • I find a bat flying in my living room. What should I do?

    Don’t panic – just close the doors, open the window and let it fly out. Don’t try and throw a towel over the bat to put it outside as this will injure it – bats have a sophisticated echolocation system that will help it find the open window. If in doubt, or if bats are frequently appearing in your house, phone the National Bat Helpline on 0345 1300 228 or use their Contact page

  • I have found uninjured bat which seems unable to fly. What should I do?

    If you are in West Yorkshire call the Bat Conservation Trust Helpline on 0345 1300 228 or use their contact page. If there are cats around or the bat is in further danger, wear gloves and place the bat in a cardboard box with a tissue or a piece of cloth in one corner and a shallow lid with water (e.g. the foil top from a milk bottle) so the bat can drink. Punch small holes in the lid to allow air into the box, and keep it in a warm place until help comes.

  • I have found a dead bat. What should I do with it?

    Only handle the bat with gloves. All dead bats that are found by members of the public are sent for analysis as part of a passive surveillance programme for rabies. Call the National Bat Helpline on 0345 1300 228 or use their Contact page. They will either send a bat worker to collect the bat, or will send you a pack so that the bat can be sent to the Veterinary Laboratories Agency for analysis

  • I suspect a roost is being damaged or bats are being disturbed. What should I do?

    Damage, destruction and obstruction of roosts and disturbance of bats are criminal offences. You should contact your local police station and explain that you think a wildlife crime is being committed. Make sure you get a crime reference number. For more information contact the National Bat Helpline or phone them on 0345 1300 228.

  • I’ve found bats in my roof/under the eaves, what should I do?

    If you would like any information or advice, contact the National Bat Helpline or call them on 0345 1300 228 . They will be able to identify the number and species of bats in your roost, as well as helping with any questions or concerns you may have.

  • Can I catch rabies from a bat?

    The chances of catching rabies from a bat are very slim. Only six cases of rabies in British bats have been recorded since 1986, and these have all been found in one species which rarely roosts in houses and is extremely unlikely to come into contact with humans. You are only at risk if you are bitten by a bat – if you do not come into physical contact with a bat you are not at risk. If you do have to handle a bat then wear gloves to minimise any risk.

  • What should I do if I am bitten by a bat?

    If you are bitten by a bat then you should wash the wound immediately with soap and water for at least 5 minutes. Do not harm or kill the bat, but contain it in a tightly sealed cardboard box with air holes, a cloth or tissue and a shallow tray such as a milk-bottle lid with water, so that it can be assessed by a bat worker. See your GP as soon as possible for advice and to obtain a post-exposure injection.